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SCANNING GUIDE AND CALCULATOR

ORIGINAL ART
Enter dimensions of the original image. In case the image is to be cropped, enter dimensions of its usable part only. For greater accuracy do not include borders.

Width  (in)
Height  (in)

FINAL PRINT
Enter dimensions of the final image. If the print is to be framed, make allowance for the frame opening. Typically, commercial frames cut into the image by about 0.25 inch on all sides – for example, an 8x10 frame has a clear opening of 7.5x9.5.

Width  (in)
Height  (in)

PRINTER RESOLUTION  (dpi):
Enter "printer resolution" as:
"72" – if you intend to send the image as an attachment to e-mail,
"300" – for an ordinary print,
"600" – or higher, for the best quality restoration and enhancement work, and a print much larger than the original image.

Resolution  (dpi)

IMAGE WILL BE SCALED TO FIT -

RECOMMENDED SCANNING RESOLUTION  (dpi):

RESULTING FILE SIZE  (MB):

RGB color
Grayscale


CHOOSE COLOR OR GRAYSCALE:
We recommend color setting - color files contain 3 times more valuable data than grayscale. Old, vintage prints that are yellowed, faded, or stained can be more successfully restored or enhanced from color scans, even if their originals were just black-and-white.

SELECT FILE FORMAT:

For e-mail attachments and ordinary (low-resolution) scans – use jpg format, with high quality (little compression) setting.
JPG (or JPEG) format compresses (reduces file size) by replacing areas of similar pixels by large solid blocks. This format causes data loss, which may be significant when the image file is saved repeatedly. Generally, JPG images cannot be effectively enhanced, or, enlarged without a visible degradation and loss of sharpness.

For files intended for restoration or enhancement work – use tif, psd (Photoshop) or similar formats which do not compress the image data. Absolutely, do not use any sharpening, descreening, dust and scratches removal, or color correction functions of your scanner. Make sure they are all turned off before you start your scan.

We prefer to work with tif or psd (Photoshop) formats, and we strongly suggest them to you. Why reduce or limit the obtainable quality of the restored images right at the start by not making the scan as good as possible? The size of our working files usually is at least 100 MB, sometimes reaching 400 MB; this allows us to successfully print images with dimensions at least twice as large as those of their originals. Such enlargements are not feasible when starting from JPG images.

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THE IMPORTANCE OF ADEQUATE SCANNING RESOLUTION

Please review the sample images below. The first photo is a faded 1914 print scanned as a color (RGB) image; the second is the same image converted to black-and-white, and whose overall tonal range, density, and contrast have been enhanced.

Fiume_1
Fiume_2

COMPARISON OF SCANNING RESOLUTIONS

Below are the details of the image above scanned at resolutions of 100, 300, 600, and 1200 dpi. The coarseness of the computer screen may lead us to conclude that there is not much of a difference in quality and sharpness between any of the four samples in each group. However, when these samples are enlarged or printed, the difference becomes very noticeable.

Please click on samples below to see their enlargements.

Face_100 Fence_100 Scanning resolution: 100 dpi
These images are much too rough for any restoration and enhancement work; however, they may be entirely adequate for e-mail attachments and repair cost estimates.
Face_300 Fence_300 Scanning resolution: 300 dpi
We consider this resolution as barely sufficient for small size prints, such as 4x6, and rather inadequate for quality restoration work.
Face_600 Fence_600 Scanning resolution: 600 dpi
This is a minimum resolution required to ensure an acceptable quality of restoration. It should be even higher if the original image is cropped or enlarged.
Face_1200 Fence_1200 Scanning resolution: 1200 dpi
We use this setting most often in our work. It allows us to successfully print images, after their restoration and enhancement, in sizes at least two to three times as large as their originals.

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